Toby Fitch
Multidisciplinary Designer / Photographer / Entrepreneur
banners_wmrshellExplorations.jpg

Shell

As the Windows Mixed Reality design toolkit grows, the visual design team were encouraged create, tinker, and push the boundaries of today's technology using the Fluent Design System to create magical multi-sensory experiences. Over the years, the user-interface mainly existed in 2D form — but now's the time to expand the user-interface from 0D to 3D.

 
 

WMR: Shell Explorations

2017 Q2  |  Microsoft  |  Concept, Visual, UI, UX, Interactive, Motion

As the Windows Mixed Reality design toolkit grows, the visual design team were encouraged create, tinker, and push the boundaries of today's technology using the Fluent Design System to create magical multi-sensory experiences. Over the years, the user-interface mainly existed in 2D form — but now's the time to expand the user-interface from 0D to 3D.

User Interface
Traditionally, user interfaces only exist in a flat dimension, but adding an additional dimension brings a plethora of possibilities that comes with it's own set of challenges. We were asked to quickly investigate 'toggle' effects and wanted buttons to somehow feel a bit more 'physical' with reactive materials. 

Materials
Materials play an important role in sensory experiences. They bend, stretch, bounce, shatter, and glide. Those material qualities translate to digital environments, making people want to reach out and touch our designs. I wanted to apply dynamic materials that would not only be visually appealing but also have some function in displaying various states the UI would be in (eg. disconnected vs connected). The motion studies with the start menu explorations shows multiple points of detail, from the cursor tap interaction to how the slate 'fills' with color and more.
 

 
test_materials_falloff_big.gif
test_materials_schema.gif